Tag Archives: Prompt Pay Act

Show Me the Money: Getting Paid on Private Massachusetts Construction Projects

By on March 15, 2017

As a general rule, parties to private contracts are afforded wide latitude to dictate and negotiate the terms as they see fit. While this notion of “freedom of contract” is an entrenched tradition within American law it is not without its limitations.  The Prompt Pay Act, enacted in 2010, is one such limitation that every Massachusetts sub-contractor and contractor should have an acute awareness of.

In effect the Prompt Pay Act requires that standard state provisions be incorporated into otherwise private construction contracts with an original valuation of over three million dollars. The Prompt Pay Act specifically affects the interpretation of payment clauses in such contracts.

As a reminder, “pay-if-paid” clauses create a condition precedent to subcontractor payment. That is, a subcontractor has no right to payment for completed work until the general contractor has received payment from the owner. “Pay-when-paid” clauses create no such condition precedent to subcontractor payment. Rather, the general contractor has a ‘reasonable time’ to obtain payment from the project owner, but in the event the owner does not pay the general contractor within the ‘reasonable time’ the subcontractor still has the right to seek payment from the general contractor. Ambiguous contract language often complicates the subtle, yet substantial, differences between the two types of clauses leading to high stakes contract interpretation disputes.

In 2004, Massachusetts did away with distinction between “pay-if-paid” and “pay-when-paid” clauses on state-level public construction projects.  Framingham Heavy Equip. Co., Inc. v. John T. Callahan & Sons, Inc., 807 N.E.2d 851, 855 (Mass. App. 2004). Thus with regard to Massachusetts state-level public construction projects “pay-if-paid” causes have been effectively eliminated in favor of “paid-when-paid” clauses.”

Federal-level public construction projects, on the other hand, have not completely eliminated the distinction between “pay-if-paid” and “pay-when-paid” contract clauses. On federal-level public construction projects “pay-if-paid” language included in a subcontract could complicate subcontractor recovery in relation to the principal contractor. The limited amount of Federal case law on the issue, however, leads to the inference that Federal Courts disfavor allowing “pay-if-paid” clauses to operate in the federal-level public construction context.

The Prompt Pay Act directs that, on private construction projects valued at over three million dollars, payment clauses be interpreted as “pay-when-paid,” thus effectively eliminating “pay-if-paid” in most instances. Specifically, and with very narrow exception, “[a] provision in a contract for construction which makes payment to a person performing the construction conditioned upon receipt of payment from a third person that is not a party to the contract shall be void and unenforceable.” MGL c. 149 sec. 29E (e).

This statutory language is a clear attempt, in the name of the broad public interest, to provide protections to subcontractors by endeavoring to ensure swift payment for work provided in order to keep construction projects moving and companies afloat by regulating cash flow.

Smith Ironworks, Inc. v. Torrey Co., Inc., Not Reported in N.E.3d (2014), is the only Massachusetts case to discuss the Prompt Pay Act at any length. Even so, it is an arbitration decision as discussed in Smith, and not the Court itself, that provides the limited interpretation of the Act. In Smith, the subcontractor applied for payment from the contractor for work provided on a private project. Disputes as to the actual amount owed existed, however, rather than actively reject the request for payment, the contractor did not respond at all. Pursuant to the terms of the Prompt Pay Act the request for payment was deemed approved after the statutorily prescribed time passed without formal rejection. The parties submitted to voluntary arbitration and an arbitrator found that the contractor was liable to the subcontractor for the amounts submitted, plus interest, as the contractor failed to properly respond to the request for payment as prescribed by the Prompt Pay Act. The contractor was deemed liable even though it had not been paid in full by the owner.

To reiterate, while Smith details an outcome favorable to a subcontractor by application of the Prompt Pay Act, that outcome is not of true precedential value. Questions remain as to the effectiveness of the Prompt Pay Act. Specifically, questions regarding the true parameters and enforceability of payment timelines and the exact remedy for non-compliance. Thus, subcontractors should keep an eye towards the development of the law in this area and strive to understand how the Prompt Pay Act may apply to various projects. If you have any questions about payment issues on public construction projects you should contact a Massachusetts construction lawyer.

What Every Massachusetts Subcontractor Must Know to Limit Risk and Get Paid for Work in New Hampshire

By on February 2, 2015

Massachusetts subcontractors securing work in New Hampshire will encounter an unfamiliar legal landscape containing more than one trap for the unwary. In order to strike a fair deal and to put your business in the best position to get paid for your work, every subcontractor should be aware of certain basic differences in laws of the Granite State.

Put Your Business in “Good Standing”

Before any foreign based entity can transact business in New Hampshire, it must be registered with the Secretary of State. The process for registering your business is relatively straightforward and requires that the entity file several basic documents, pay a filing fee and name a registered agent in New Hampshire to accept service of process on behalf of the foreign entity. After complying with the Secretary of State’s requirements, your business will be in Good Standing with the State of New Hampshire and ready to move forward with projects in New Hampshire.

Striking a Fair Deal

In order to reach an agreement with a general contractor or construction manager that your business can live with and live up to, you need to know the laws that govern your contract. New Hampshire law varies in important ways from its counterpart in Massachusetts. Being familiar with some of the basic and important distinctions in the law will put your business in a better position to compete and succeed on your subcontracts.

One of the more important distinctions of which to be mindful is that in New Hampshire a subcontractor can waive its right to assert a mechanic’s lien against a project by contract. Because many general contractors, construction managers and savvy owners in New Hampshire know this, these waiver provisions are found commonly in contracts provided to subcontractors. Because Massachusetts law prohibits these provisions, subcontractors agreeing to perform work in New Hampshire must devote full attention to this detail, in order to avoid extinguishing mechanic’s lien rights unknowingly. If any doubts linger about whether a particular provision in a contract will result in a waiver of lien rights, it is important to consult your attorney.

Another important distinction exists with respect to conditional payment provisions, often known as “pay-if-paid” or “pay-when-paid.” With the enactment of the Massachusetts Prompt Payment Act in 2010, subcontractors gained significant rights in private contracting that were formerly the subject of bargaining between the parties. One of the chief among those rights is that in private construction projects with a prime contract in excess of three million dollars, so-called pay-if-paid provisions are unenforceable except in two rare instances. Since the enactment of this statute, pay-if-paid provisions in Massachusetts rarely result in significant losses to subcontractors.

In New Hampshire, however, no prompt payment act or functional equivalent has been enacted, and the New Hampshire Supreme Court has not addressed the pay-if-paid issue directly. Accordingly, significant uncertainty remains regarding the enforceability of these provisions in all private construction contracts, and subcontractors are wise to avoid or limit these provisions when possible.

Working in tandem with the Prompt Payment Act, the recently enacted Massachusetts Retainage Act limits owners and general contractors withholding retainage to no more than five percent on each progress payment on private construction contracts of three million dollars or more. Like the Prompt Payment Act, New Hampshire has no equivalent law to the Retainage Act. As a result, retainage provisions in construction contracts are subject to bargaining, and general contractors and owners commonly propose withholding retainage of ten percent or more. Because these provisions are not subject to any maximum by law, subcontractors should endeavor to negotiate these provisions down or, at a minimum, negotiate a phased release of retainage over the course of a project. Reducing or phasing retainage is vitally important for subcontractors that perform work at the inception of a project, like site work contractors, because commercial contracts commonly direct that withheld retainage be released only after completion of the entire project, and not after completion of a particular subcontractor’s work. As a practical matter, this can mean months or years of delay until retainage is released if the retainage provision is not drafted or revised to avoid this result.

Getting Paid

Subcontractors that avoid waiving lien rights, avoid pay-if-paid provisions, and negotiate fair retainage schedules have taken important steps toward getting paid for completed work. The job isn’t done completely, however, as important steps remain to secure payment. Most notably, subcontractors are well advised to take steps to preserve their mechanic’s lien rights at the outset of a project and during its duration as New Hampshire’s mechanic’s lien law and procedure are markedly different from that encountered in Massachusetts.

New Hampshire mechanic’s lien law draws an important distinction between those that have a direct contract with the project owner (usually the general contractor) and those that do not (subcontractors and suppliers). If you fall into the latter category, as a first or second tier subcontractor or supplier, you must have a contract with the general contractor or first tier subcontractor and provide the project owner written notice of your lien rights. Ostensibly, the law requires the written notice to prevent the owner from becoming subject to liability for claims asserted by parties that were unknown to the owner. As practical matter, providing written notice to the owner of lien rights is a matter of preserving a subcontractor’s ability to establish, perfect and maintain a mechanic’s lien on a project in the event that payments are late or aren’t coming at all.

In New Hampshire, a subcontractor’s right to assert and enforce a mechanic’s lien is directly tied to when the subcontractor provides the required notice of lien rights. In an ideal world, subcontractors would provide the required notice to the owner at the outset of the project, preserving the full value of their lien. More frequently than not, however, subcontractors fail to send the owner notice of lien rights until after beginning work and a problem has arisen. When that occurs, a subcontractor’s lien rights are limited to the amount remaining due from the owner or general contractor to the party upstream of the subcontractor. In other words, the subcontractor’s lien is good only to the extent of any payment remaining due to the party from which the subcontractor will be paid when notice is given to the owner. This can be problematic when payments slow down or stop completely toward the end of a project and the subcontractor failed to provide notice of its lien rights at the beginning of the project, because notice may arrive at a time when little or nothing remains due to the party from which the subcontractor seeks payment through its contract. In that instance, even if the subcontractor has complied in all other respects with its contractual obligations, no valid lien exists in connection with its work on the project. As a result, the importance of providing early notice of lien rights to the owner cannot be overstated.

The lien process has other pitfalls for uninitiated. In New Hampshire, mechanic’s lien rights are valid and enforceable for only 120 days following the subcontractor’s last date of work, or delivery of materials in the case of a supplier. Ordinarily, a subcontractor’s last date of work is calculated from the point of substantial completion of the subcontractor’s work, and closing punch list items or returning to the project to remedy deficient or defective work will not support an extension of the 120 day deadline to perfect the lien.

In order to perfect a mechanic’s lien, subcontractors must file suit in court, petition the court for a mechanic’s lien attachment and record the lien with the Registry of Deeds in the county in which the project is located within the 120 day period subsequent to substantial completion. Failure to do any of the foregoing is fatal to enforcing a mechanic’s lien.

So, given the complexities associated with establishing and perfecting a lien in a timely fashion, why do it when the general contractor or owner will simply “bond it off?” The simple answer is that in New Hampshire the prevailing law does not compel a subcontractor to accept alternate security for its perfected lien. As a result, owners and general contractors cannot force a valid mechanic’s lien to be discharged solely on the basis of providing alternate security for subcontractors’ claims. In many circumstances, there are very good reasons why subcontractors prefer to maintain mechanic’s liens rather than accepting bonds or other security. For a more detailed recitation of those reasons, or to understand mechanic’s lien law in New Hampshire in greater detail, please consult a New Hampshire construction attorney.  

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