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Punch List and Remedial Work May Not Extend the 120 Day Period to Secure a Mechanic’s Lien in New Hampshire

            A recent ruling in the Rockingham County Superior Court offers further guidance to contractors regarding the extent of the right to maintain a mechanic’s lien in New Hampshire.  In the matter of Fabcon Precast, LLC, v. Zirkelbach Construction, Inc., et al. Strang Scott attorney Corey N. Giroux secured a discharge of the plaintiff’s mechanic’s lien as untimely for its client, Zirkelbach Construction, Inc., of Florida, despite the plaintiff performing work within the statutory 120 period to perfect a mechanic’s lien.

            The plaintiff, Fabcon Precast, LLC, secured a mechanic’s lien against the subject project, on an ex parte basis, in September of 2015.  Fabcon completed its scope of work on the project in January of 2015, and issued a sworn payment application to the general contractor indicating that it had completed 100% of its scope of work on the project at that time.  Subsequently, in May of 2015, Fabcon returned to address punch list items related to its scope of work.  While on site to complete the punch list work, Fabcon’s workers performed some limited work that they had failed to perform initially that was properly part of Fabcon’s original scope of work on the project.

            In order to secure a mechanic’s lien against the project, it was necessary for Fabcon to perfect its mechanic’s lien within 120 days of its last date of work on the project.  Thus, in order for its September 2015 attachment to be proper, Fabcon relied upon the punch list work and other work performed in May of 2015 to support its right to the mechanic’s lien.  Fabcon argued that its punch list work, and the “new” work performed – that is, the work it failed to perform that was part of its subcontract — was sufficient to support its mechanic’s lien pursuant to NH RSA 447, New Hampshire’s mechanic’s lien statute.

            On behalf of its client, Strang Scott argued that the September 2015 lien was defective because Fabcon’s work in May of 2015 was insufficient to support the mechanic’s lien and therefore insufficient to extend the 120 day statutory period to perfect its lien.  In particular, it was argued that Fabcon’s sworn payment application in January 2015, which averred that Fabcon had completed 100% of its work in January 2015, commenced the running of the 120 period for Fabcon to perfect its lien, despite the subsequent performance of punch list, remedial, or original scope work by the plaintiff.  The Court agreed. 

            The Court directed the plaintiff “could have preserved its right to extend the lien by representing [in January] that it still needed to complete some work.”  “Because it represented that the work was 100% complete, the Court finds that the work performed …. was remedial.  The 120 days [to perfect the plaintiff’s lien] began to run on January 15, 2015.”

            This ruling should be instructive for subcontractors and general contractors alike.  Subcontractors should be careful to avoid representing to general contractors that they have fully completed their scope of work if punch list or other work remains to be performed on their subcontracts.  General contractors should take care to insure that their payment applications contain sworn statements from subcontractors as to the extent of the work performed or which payment is sought.  Contractors with questions regarding the extent, duration or nature of their mechanic’s lien rights would be well-advised to consult with their New Hampshire construction attorney.

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