Tag Archives: Chapter 93A

Understanding the Limitations of Chapter 93A: Pre-Litigation Attorneys’ Fees Not Recoverable

By on January 30, 2018

The Regulation of Business Practices for Consumer Protection Act, commonly referred to by its statutory chapter number, “Chapter 93A,” is a frequently utilized statute that provides individual consumers and businesses with a right to bring legal action and recover damages if they are harmed by an unfair business practice.  Under the statute, “unfair or deceptive acts or practices” or “unfair methods of competition” committed while conducting business in Massachusetts permit the harmed party to recover their actual damages, or a statutory minimum of $25 per offense (whichever is greater), and up to three times such damages for knowing and willful violations of the statute, plus an award for reasonable attorneys’ fees and the costs of the lawsuit.  Chapter 93A creates harsh penalties, with a wide-reaching scope, to deter unfair business acts, however, it does have limitations.

Previously, we explained the prohibition on Chapter 93A recovery with regard to a party’s decision to litigate a dispute, rather than settle with the opposing party.

A second limitation on recovery under Chapter 93A relates to the timing of when a party’s legal fees are incurred. Recently, the Suffolk County Superior Court considered the issue of whether pre-litigation attorneys’ fees are recoverable under Chapter 93A in Beninati, et al. v. Borghi, et al. The court awarded double damages to one of the plaintiffs under Chapter 93A. The defendants who were found liable under Chapter 93A then moved the court to reduce the attorneys’ fees award by $170,000 for fees incurred prior to the filing of the lawsuit, relating to “extensive settlement discussions.” The court agreed that pre-litigation fees are not recoverable under Chapter 93A, stating that it “is aware of no authority that permits the award of fees incurred before the litigation began and that do not bear directly on its preparation.”  Accordingly, the court excluded the pre-litigation attorneys’ fees from the award.

This case is just one example of the importance of understanding the process of litigating claims and the implications of dealing with an adverse party.  Depending on the circumstances of a dispute, it can be wise to initiate litigation sooner to ensure large portions of incurred attorneys’ fees are ultimately recoverable from the party causing the harm. To learn more about scope and application of Chapter 93A, contact an experienced Massachusetts litigation attorney.

Understanding the Limitations of Chapter 93A – Pursuing Litigation Is Not Unfair or Deceptive

By on February 26, 2017

Companies operating or conducting business in Massachusetts are aware of an all-too-familiar statute, Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 93A. This statute provides individual consumers and businesses a right to bring legal action if they are harmed by an unfair business practice. The statute eloquently, although perhaps ambiguously, states that a violation shall exist when a company commits an “unfair or deceptive act or practice, or unfair method of competition,” against another who is engaged in commerce within the Commonwealth.  Violations can cover a litany of topics, such as a company that unfairly demands more money to complete its contract obligations after having already executed the contract (Anthony’s Pier Four, Inc. v. HBC Associates, 411 Mass. 451), or where insurance providers fail to offer a fair and equitable settlement amount within the required time period (Rhodes v. AIG Domestic Claims, Inc., 461 Mass. 486), or against landlords who fail to provide habitable units to their residential tenants (Haddad v. Gonzalez, 410 Mass. 855).  Although Chapter 93A is far-reaching, it does have its limitations.

Recently, Strang Scott attorneys Cole Young and Jennifer Lynn argued to the Massachusetts Appeals Court that litigation tactics alone are not unfair or deceptive acts or practices, such that they violate Chapter 93A.  Agreeing, the Appeals Court held that demanding payment under a contract, filing suit, and continuing to litigate a claim over a disputed amount is a simple contract dispute and nothing more. Aggregate Industries ­– Northeast Region, Inc. v. Hugo Key & Sons, Inc., 90 Mass.App.Ct. 146 (2016).   Said another way, the Appeals Court held that plaintiffs should not be punished for deciding to litigate, rather than accepting a lower settlement amount.  The Appeals Court went on to hold that the unfair or deceptive practice must arise from an independent act of trade or commerce, “not tangentially from litigation concerning that conduct.” 

The precedent of this case will be far-reaching and provides security to companies and businesses who choose to file suit, as opposed to being forced into settlement for fear of committing an “unfair” act.  Because the breadth of Chapter 93A can be complicated and nuanced, potential litigants should speak with an experienced Massachusetts litigator.