Category Archives: News

Massachusetts Implements New Diversity Initiatives For Public Construction

By on July 2, 2020

Starting July 1, 2020, the Commonwealth is implementing new strategies to enhance women and minority participation on public construction projects. Through its Affirmative Marketing Program (“AMP”) Massachusetts is “amping” up its outreach, education and training efforts to attract more women-owned business (“WBE”) and minority-owned business (“MBE”) contractors, material suppliers, and design professionals.

In order to maximize effectiveness, the participation goals will be separate and distinct for MBE as compared to WBE, as well as being project specific, and falling under the umbrella of annual goals. The goals will seek to address existing disparities while considering availability of MBE and WBE options for each project. The new rules will apply to the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance (“DCAMM”) and certain other public building projects.

Governor Baker also recently proposed legislation that will create even more opportunities for MBE and WBE businesses in public construction work, which would provide new opportunities for small MBE and WBE businesses to participate in certain projects. Stay tuned for updates on that legislation.

For more information on the new AMP initiatives check out the DCAMM website at www.mass.gov/dcamm-contract-compliance or contact your construction lawyer.

Housing Security Bill Signed Into Law, Freezing Residential and Small-Business Evictions

By on April 21, 2020

On Monday, April 20, 2020, Governor Baker signed House Security Bill 4647, entitled “An Act Providing for a Moratorium on Evictions and Foreclosures during the COVID-19 Emergency.” The legislation will halt “non-essential” residential and small business commercial evictions for 120 days, or 45 days after Governor Baker lifts the COVID-19 Emergency Declaration.

Impact of the Housing Security Bill.

The bill will not relieve tenants from any obligation to pay rent, or restrict a landlord’s ability to recover unpaid rent, but is our legislature’s response to the financial hardships created by the COVID-19 pandemic. The bill halts “non-essential evictions” against residential tenants and “small business” commercial tenants. “Non-essential evictions” include evictions for non-payment of rent, those resulting from a foreclosure, “no-fault” evictions, and “cause” evictions wherein the alleged cause does not involve allegations of criminal activity or lease violations that impact the health and safety of other residents, health care workers, emergency personnel, persons lawfully on the property, or the general public. “Small business” commercial tenants are commercial tenants, both for-profit and non-profit, where the tenant (or a subsidiary company, joint venture, or other party in control with the tenant) does not operate in multiple states / nations or trade publicly, and has less than 150 full-time equivalent employees. However, commercial landlords may still commence eviction proceedings against small business tenants for an expired lease term or default, prior to the COVID-19 emergency, by the tenant under the terms of their lease.

Prohibition Against Evictions.

In suspending non-essential evictions, the housing security bill sets forth specific prohibitions against landlords, the courts, and the sheriffs / constables during the effective period. Landlords are prohibited from taking actions to terminate a residential tenancy for the purpose of a non-essential eviction, including terminating the tenancy, sending notices (including notices to quit), and requesting or demanding a tenant to vacate the dwelling. The bill bars the courts (with respect to both residential and commercial non-essential evictions) from:

  • accepting writs, summonses, or complaints for filing in a summary process or eviction action;
  • entering judgment or default judgment for possession;
  • issuing executions for possession;
  • denying requested stays of execution or continuance of a summary process action; and
  • scheduling court events (including summary process trial).

Furthermore, to protect any summary process and eviction actions entered prior to the COVID-19 emergency, the bill extends deadlines and time periods for action by parties to a non-essential eviction, including answering a complaint and appealing a judgment or levy. Sheriffs, constables, and other persons who are otherwise empowered to carry out or levy upon an execution, are prohibited from enforcing or levying upon executions for possession of either a residential premises or small business commercial premises.

Notice By Tenants to Avoid Fees and Negative Credit Reporting.

The housing security bill enables residential and small business commercial tenants to avoid late fees and credit reporting if, within 30 days of missing a rent payment, they submit notice and documentation to their landlord stating that their nonpayment is the result of financial hardship from COVID-19. If the tenant provides timely notice and documentation, the bill prohibits the landlord from imposing late fees for nonpayment or submitting rental payment data to a consumer reporting agencies.

The above is a summary of the bill’s effect on evictions during the COVID-19 emergency. The above does not constitute legal advice. If you are a landlord seeking to understand your options during this emergency time or a tenant experiencing financial hardships, you should consult an experienced Massachusetts attorney to understand your rights and remedies.

Strang Scott Announces Hiring of New Associate

By on December 20, 2019

Strang Scott is pleased to welcome first-year associate Meghan Hayes to the firm.  Ms. Hayes is a 2019 graduate of Boston University School of Law.  While in law school, Ms. Hayes worked with the New York State Attorney General’s Office, the Erie County Bar Association Volunteer Lawyers’ Project, and a prominent tort litigation firm in the greater Boston area.

Ms. Hayes hails from the Buffalo area, and earned an undergraduate degree with honors, majoring in Political Science and minoring in Mathematics at the State University of New York at Geneseo. Before starting law school at BU, Ms. Hayes completed a year of service with AmeriCorps.

At BU Law, Ms. Hayes won the best brief award in the Stone Moot Court competition, competed in the honors level Albers Moot Court competition, and also competed in the National Appellate Advocacy competition. She served on the Public Interest Law Journal and participated in BU Law’s Public Interest Program.

Ms. Hayes plans to be active in the BU Law Young Alumni Council and the Boston Bar Association.  She is a recreational runner, loves road trips and is a furniture refinishing enthusiast.

Strang Scott Attorneys Selected as Super Lawyers

By on October 17, 2019

Strang Scott is honored to announce the selection of Christopher Strang as a 2019 Super Lawyer by the Massachusetts edition of Super Lawyers. Mr. Strang has been recognized for his outstanding work in construction litigation for the eleventh consecutive year, first as a Rising Star and then as a Super Lawyer. Associate Jennifer Lynn was selected as a Rising Star for the first time. The Super Lawyers selection team chooses only 5% of eligible attorneys as Super Lawyers, and only 2.5% of eligible attorneys as Rising Stars. Both lists are the result of a process that includes a statewide lawyer survey, independent research, and peer reviews.

Strang Scott Seeking Mid-Level Litigation Associate

By on August 30, 2019

Strang, Scott, Giroux & Young, a regional business law firm, is currently seeking a highly skilled, mid-level litigation associate to join the firm’s Boston office.

Successful candidates will have:

  • 3+ years of experience representing business plaintiffs and defendants in a range of commercial litigation matters
  • Experience in all stages of litigation from investigation and pleadings through discovery, dispositive motions, and trial
  • Excellent oral and written communications skills
  • Commitment to provide high quality client service
  • Ability to work both independently and as part of a larger collaborative team
  • Strong academic credentials


We have a preference for associates admitted in both MA and NH, or one who is willing to become admitted in both. Some knowledge of construction law would be helpful. 

We offer the ability to grow and thrive in a law firm platform designed for attorneys with long-term professional development aspirations.

Interested candidates may send a resume and cover letter to:

Christopher Strang

Strang, Scott, Giroux & Young, LLP
6 Beacon Street, Suite 305
Boston, MA 02108
Email: cstrang@strangscott.com

Strang Scott Sponsors TEDx Kenmore Square

By on March 22, 2019

Strang Scott is exited to announce that it is a sponsor for the first ever TEDx event in Kenmore Square.    This independently organized TED event celebrates the heritage and development of Boston’s beloved Kenmore Square neighborhood, featuring speakers from various focus areas and degrees. The list of presenters is as exciting as it is diverse, and includes Dave McGillivray (director of the Boston Marathon), Dr. Greg Skomal (frequent guest of the Discovery Channel’s Shark Week) and Dr. Georgies Mgode (pioneer of animal research and training for disease detection).  The event will be held April 5, 2019 from 12:30 – 6:30 PM at the Hotel Commonwealth

With sponsors like the Boston Red Sox, Eastern Standard, 829 Studios and Boston City Properties, this event aims to “attract the original and nurture the unconventional in hopes of sparking creative solutions.” Strang, Scott, Giroux & Young, LLP is proud to promote this move in favor of innovation.  For more information on becoming a sponsor, please contact Cole Young

TEDx Kenmore Square

Jennifer Lynn to Co-Panel Discussion of the Massachusetts Security Deposit Law

By on March 12, 2019

Strang Scott associate, Jennifer Lynn, was a panelist at a recent Boston Bar Association event discussing M.G.L. c. 186, § 15B, commonly known as the “Massachusetts Security Deposit Law,” and providing an overview of the Law’s requirements. The Law is one of the most heavily litigated statutes in Massachusetts that affects both landlords and tenants. In addition, to the statutory requirements, the panelists discussed the implications of the recent opinion from the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, Phillips v. Equity Residential Management, LLC, 478 Mass. 251 (2017).

Christopher Strang Appointed as Lecturer at Boston University School of Law

By on February 12, 2019

Boston University School of Law recently hired partner Christopher Strang as an adjunct lecturer.  Mr. Strang will be instructing the Small and Mid-Sized Firm Externship Program.

The program involves students working part-time at area small and mid-sized firms with various areas of practice.  Mr. Strang will teach practical skills in the classroom portion of the program, designed to enhance the students’ abilities to excel in the practice of law at the firms for whom they work.

Check out his faculty page here: https://www.bu.edu/law/profile/christopher-d-strang/

Non-Compete Reform Comes to Massachusetts

By on August 30, 2018

     After years of trying to find common ground on non-compete reform, the Massachusetts legislature passed a bill – which Governor Charlie Baker signed into law on August 10, 2018 – that promises to significantly change the employment landscape in the Commonwealth. The new law will take effect on October 1, 2018.

The following is a brief, non-exhaustive overview of some of the law’s most notable features:

  • The law defines a non-competition agreement as an “agreement between an employer and an employee, or otherwise arising out of an existing or anticipated employment relationship, under which the employee or expected employee agrees that the employee will not engage in certain specified activities competitive with the employee’s employer after the employment relationship has ended,” but excludes certain agreements from its purview, including: (1) non-compete agreements made in connection with the sale of a business; (2) non-compete agreements made in connection with the cessation or separation of employment (provided the employee is given seven business days to rescind acceptance); (3) employee non-solicitation covenants; (4) customer/client/vendor non-solicitation covenants; and (5) non-disclosure of confidential information agreements.                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
  • Both traditional employees and independent contractors are covered under the law.                                                                                                                                                                                              
  • All agreements must be in writing and signed by both parties, and must expressly affirm an employee’s right to consult with counsel before signing.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
  • If a non-compete agreement is signed at the beginning of an employment relationship, it must be given to the employee when the employment offer is made or 10 days before the commencement of employment, whichever is earlier.  Agreements signed after the commencement of employment must be “supported by fair and reasonable consideration independent from the continuation of employment.”                                                                                
  • The law requires so-called “garden leave pay” or some “other mutually agreed-upon consideration.” Garden leave pay refers to an agreement in which the employer, during the course of the restricted period, continues to pay the former employee at least 50 percent of the “highest annualized base salary” that employee received within the two years preceding his or her termination. The law does not further define or elaborate upon what “other consideration” might be acceptable in lieu of garden leave pay, however.  In addition, it remains to be seen whether garden leave pay constitutes sufficient consideration for those non-competes executed after the commencement of an employment relationship, or whether some consideration above and beyond the garden leave pay is required in those circumstances.                                                                                                                                                  
  • Agreements not to compete must be “reasonable.” They can be no broader than necessary to protect a legitimate business interest; they cannot exceed one year in duration; their geographic scope must be reasonable; and they must otherwise be reasonable “in the scope of proscribed activities in relation to the interests protected.”                                                   
  • Non-compete agreements may not be enforced against non-exempt employees; undergraduate or graduate students engaged in short-term employment; employees who have been terminated without cause or laid off; or employees who are 18 years old or younger.                                                                                                                                                      

These new requirements apply only to non-compete agreements entered into on or after October 1, 2018. Nevertheless, employers may wish to revise existing non-compete agreements for current employees in order to avoid disparities amongst employees, as well as potential future litigation.