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Massachusetts Proceeds with Proposal to Impose Tax on Short-Term Rentals like Airbnb

By on June 19, 2017

As discussed in one of our previous posts , Massachusetts legislators have continued to discuss imposing a tax on short-term rental companies like Airbnb. Recently, the Massachusetts Senate decided to proceed with Governor Charlie Baker’s proposal to expand the room occupancy tax to include short-term rentals, but not without a few modifications. Back in January, Governor Baker proposed to expand hotel taxes to include users of services like Airbnb who rent out private rooms for more than five months (150 days) per year. The proposal stated that the 5.7% state tax – and up to 6% local tax – should apply to all providers of “transient accommodations.”

The Senate’s proposal, which was published in late May, adopts and expands upon Governor Baker’s initial proposal. Instead of only applying the room occupancy tax to private rooms that are rented out for more than five months per year, the Senate proposes imposing the tax on all “transient accommodations.” In contrast to Governor Baker’s proposal, which suggested encompassing long-term Airbnb providers under the definition of “hotels,” the Senate’s proposal introduces an entirely new category of housing that would be subjected to the room occupancy tax. “Transient accommodation” would encompass all “owner-occupied, tenant-occupied or non-owner occupied property . . . that is not a hotel, motel, lodging house or bed and breakfast establishment” where at least one room is rented to an occupant and all accommodations are reserved in advance. This new category of accommodation would expand the application of the room occupancy tax to all Airbnb-type services, regardless of their frequency. As a result of this proposed expansion, the state Senate’s proposal is projected to raise $18 million in 2018.

In a television ad Airbnb declared its support for the proposed rental tax in Massachusetts. Although similar ads ran last summer, the new ad reaffirms the company’s “commit[ment] to working with Massachusetts on new, common-sense home sharing rules. We want to collect and pay taxes for our hosts and protect affordable housing. Together, we can make sure all of Massachusetts benefits.” At this point it appears that at least some tax will be levied on companies like Airbnb in the very near future. The effect on hosts and customers remains unknown.  Strang Scott will continue to follow the progress of the proposed tax.

Cole Young
As an attorney with a degree in civil engineering, his practice focuses primarily on construction and commercial real estate transactions and litigation.
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