Articles/Publications

“Ban-the-Box” Update for Employers

By on May 21, 2018

Since 2010, employers in Massachusetts have been prohibited, under the Criminal Offender Record Information (“CORI”) Reform Act, from requiring a job applicant to check a box indicating that he or she has a criminal history (the “ban-the-box” law).  Employers are also prohibited from requiring applicants and employees to disclose certain criminal information, including arrests and criminal cases that did not result in a conviction; first convictions for various misdemeanor offenses; misdemeanor convictions where the date of conviction or release from incarceration occurred five or more years prior to the date of the employment application (in the absence of an intervening conviction); juvenile records; and sealed criminal records.

Under new amendments to the CORI Reform Act signed by Governor Baker on April 13, 2018, and slated to take effect on October 13, 2018, employers may not inquire into misdemeanor convictions where the date of the conviction occurred three or more years from the date of the application (unless there was an intervening conviction).  In addition, employers may not ask applicants about “a criminal record, or anything related to a criminal record, that has been sealed or expunged . . . .”  Finally, employers must include the following statement on any application “which seeks information concerning prior arrests or conviction of the applicant”: “An applicant for employment with a record expunged pursuant to section 100F, section 100G, section 100H or section 100K of chapter 276 of the General Laws may answer ‘no record’ with respect to an inquiry herein relative to prior arrests, criminal court appearances or convictions. An applicant for employment with a record expunged pursuant to section 100F, section 100G, section 100H or section 100K of chapter 276 of the General Laws may answer ‘no record’ to an inquiry herein relative to prior arrests, criminal court appearances, juvenile court appearances, adjudications or convictions.”

Employers are advised to take note of these important changes and revise their applications, and application processes, accordingly.

Alexandra Deal